photography

Photographing the 4th of July at the McKinley Presidential Monument in Canton, Ohio

i love photographing fireworks — the mckinley monument has some of the best.

Fireworks offer so many amazing opportunities for amazing photographs and no other day delivers in the U.S. like the 4th of July. These pictures were taken by Benjamin Lehman during Canton, Ohio’s Fourth of July celebrations at the McKinley Presidential Monument. The monument itself is such a strong, beautiful piece of architecture that it serves to make photographing fireworks here that much better.

Enjoy!

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Benjamin Lehman is a commercial photographer in the Canton, Ohio, Northeast Ohio region.

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Wedding Photography at the Morris Museum and Morristown Hyatt in New Jersey

Wedding Photography at the Morris Museum and Morristown Hyatt in New Jersey

(edited 2:53pm)

This past May Benjamin Lehman Photography was given the opportunity to shoot a gorgeous wedding in historic Morristown, NJ. A little history about Morristown, and I’ll keep this brief; Morristown stood as the headquarters a for General George Washington’s and the Continental Army after victories in Trenton and Princeton. Much of the scenery reflects the areas colonial heritage — this leads to many great photographic opportunities if you know exactly how to work the history into photos.

The morning of the wedding started with me, my cameras and the wedding party getting ready at the Morristown Hyatt. The Hyatt is swathed in beautiful decor and style, making it very easy to take great photos.

When I work alone, (as I did for much of this wedding), I make sure to know the schedule for the day down to a T. I often go as far as to measure the time it will take me to get between points A and B the day before so I can factor driving and walking times into my own schedule.

I started the day with the bride and the bridesmaids getting ready in the bridal suite. In many ways, these are my favorite photos to take during the day of the wedding. The girls are always full of smiles, the atmosphere is filled with excitement and the over all transformation of becoming a bride is a magical thing.

Once I’ve taken a few shots of the ladies, I’ll head over to where the gents are getting prepared. Guys are also fun to photograph, but for different reasons. The atmosphere with groom and groomsman is almost always laid back. It usually constitutes of one or more guys asking another how to properly tie a tie, discussing sports, and dirty jokes.

Shooting with the guys usually goes fairly fast, maybe 15 to 30 minutes. Then I head back to the girl’s room to capture some more pictures as they finish getting ready.

Some weddings schedule time for Bridal Party photos after the wedding ceremony, and some do it before. For our gig in New Jersey we had 2 hours before the ceremony to get all the photos we needed. Because I had scouted many locations the day before I had a great mental plan of attack. I would take most of my pictures in a garden behind a historical house, and save one last photo for a specific place in the museum where the ceremony would take place.

At the last moment I did have a change of heart with taking all of the photos in the gardens — I realized I didn’t want a large bulk of the photos to have a similar background. Additionally, I’d like the groom and groomsman to have a slightly more manly environment. So, I took the guys and we went to the hotel bar. It just so happens that the Hyatt in Morristown has one of the best looking contemporary bars I’ve ever seen. At one point I even had them order shots of whiskey so I could grab some great photos of a toast to the groom.

Once I finished with the guys in the bar, I headed with the ladies to the garden. This all happened in early May, which meant all the trees were flowering, the grass was green, and the entire area was alive.

When I pose for bridal party photos I’ll do two things. First, I’ll do the traditional stand-next-to-each-other photos. They aren’t my favorite photos, but they serve a traditional purpose.

Then, once those are out of the way I’ll start to pose my subjects like we’re shooting photos for a magazine spread. I do this by putting people throughout the environment, and adding depth and interaction between the subjects and their surroundings. You don’t have to make it too elaborate however. For this shoot, I found just a little depth in my photos between the various bridesmaids is all we needed to create some wonderful photos.

After our time in the gardens the entire wedding party packed up and headed to the wedding venue at the Morris Museum.

The museum itself is an amazing venue. It’s part old mansion, part contemporary museum with displays for both kids and adults. The ground’s curator, a great guy named Peter, gave me a personal tour. Perhaps the thing that impressed me most is the fact that there are priceless pieces of art on display without barriers to the public. If one so wished, he could walk right up to a Rembrandt and touch the very paint laid down by the master so many years ago (but,uh, don’t do that). The atmosphere of the mansion and all of it’s beautiful paints had influenced me earlier when I was scouting and it gave me an idea for a photo.

Once myself, and everyone else arrived, I ushered them into one particularly gorgeous room within the mansion. My plan was to take a wide-angle photo with the entire wedding party. I wanted it to be very stylish, very dramatic, with strong shadows and highlights. The only problem was I had to photograph a huge room and only had one studio strobe available. My solution was to use a technique where you take multiple photos, moving the light between each photo, and then merge the photos together in Photoshop to create one, complete photo that has a big-production look to it. We only had 5 minutes before the ceremony began, so I moved very quickly, posing people, taking the photo, moving the light, and taking the next photo over and over again until I knew I had all the elements I needed to create the picture I set out to capture.

Once that was finished I took my place in the back of the hall, down the center of the isle as the ceremony started. Once the ceremony starts, it then becomes a job of capturing the beauty of the wedding as it unfolds.

The evening ended with a marvelous reception. My plan of action was to be the fly on the wall who flits around and snaps all of the brilliant candid moments that happen around the room and on the dance floor.

My time in Morristown, NJ stands as one of the most superb weddings I’ve ever had the pleasure of photographing and it left me a great feeling and urge to have more experiences like this one.

Benjamin Lehman is a commercial wedding, portrait and advertising photographer willing to travel to where ever the beautiful pictures are!

Photos of you and your wedding party getting ready are some of the most important photos you’ll want to have as memories of your wedding day.

You’re going to be drop-dead gorgeous on your wedding day — your photos should be too!

Hanging out and taking pictures of the groom and his groomsman is always a blast.

Wedding photos should be timeless and look as if they belong in a magazine spread.

To create a big-production look for this photo, I took several photos while re-positioning the light between each picture. Once assembled in Photoshop, the final effect is a beautiful, cinematic portrait of the entire wedding party.

Joe McNally Explains TTL

Joe McNally is not your average Joe. With a career spanning over 30 years and including assignments in more than 50 countries, Joe McNally has shot everything everywhere in every thinkable sort of way. In addition to being an exceptionally experienced photographer, Joe is also known for his remarkable ability to share that knowledge. In this video he explains what TTL is and how to use it to improve your photography. Here is how it works, in Joe’s own words.

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Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM – Detail, Image Quality and Sharpness Test. Sample Images Included.

The Sigma 70-200 is an amazing lens, but just how amazing?

Just recently I read a lens review where the person writing the review said, “Sharpness is not something I normally notice on a lens.” To this point all I can say is, wait, what?

How can any photographer, specifically one who is writing a review of a lens, not notice how sharp a lens is? Maybe I’m wrong, but when shopping for a new lens, isn’t the sharpness of a lens just as important as it’s focal length?

For this review, I am talking specifically about the sharpness. Even more specifically, the sharpness at it’s widest aperture setting of f/2.8. I am also testing it’s sharpness with OS (optical stabilization) both on and off.

First, let’s take a look at a real world application for a lens like the 70-200 — A wedding. Weddings are a great test bed because you need a lens that can give you a sharp, great looking image in conditions you often can’t plan for. A common rule when shooting with a telephoto lens is to have your shutter speed match, if not exceed the focal length of your lens. So, if shooting at 200mm, you’d ideally have a shutter speed around 1/250. A rule like this is easy to follow if you can plan for the situation you’re shooting in, but when working a fast paced job, like a wedding, you may not always be able to comply with a rule like this. That’s why a lens with optical stabilization (also known as IS, or VC) can be so important.

Sigma at 200mm with OS on (click for larger view)

Sigma at 200mm with OS on (click for larger view)

Here are two sample images illustrating the sharpness of the Sigma 70-200 with OS on.  This first sample is an uncropped photo, straight from the camera. Even at this size, not zoomed in, it’s apparent how clean the details are. It’s even more amazing when you consider this image was shot at 1/80th of a second, zoomed in at 200mm. That’s way below the threshold for steady, clean shooting. Shooting a lens at this speed, at this focal length would normally mean your photos would suffer from a bad case of the jitters.

Sigma at 200mm with OS on (click for larger view)

Sigma at 200mm with OS on (click for larger view)

Now let’s zoom in and look at some detail from this photo with stabilization turned on. You can easily see just how amazing this lens is. The details, like the lines around the eyes, and the eyelashes, are damn near perfectly sharp. And don’t forget, this is wide open at f/2.8. Historically a lens’ widest aperture setting is not where it performs at its best in terms of sharpness, but here we can see the Sigma performing astonishingly well.

200mm at 1/400 with OS off.

200mm at 1/400 with OS off.

So, we’ve shown that the Sigma’s sharpness with OS enabled is amazing, but does that mean it’ll function equally well when you have enough light to shoot without OS? Let’s find out!

In this first image, we can see that our subject (the bird) is acceptably sharp at f/2.8.  For reference, the focus point was placed over the bird’s eye, just as it was for our subject in the wedding photo above.

200mm at 1/400 with OS off.

200mm at 1/400 with OS off.

Here I’ve cropped the image in the way I would do it if I were sharing this photo on social media, or a photo-sharing site.

This may not be an extreme crop, but even at this modest size we can see the details are being maintained in stunning fashion.

200mm at 1/400 with OS off.

200mm at 1/400 with OS off.

This is an extreme crop. In fact, I am zooming in around 25% further than the photo’s max native resolution.

It’s here, at this extreme zoom, that we see just how awesome the Sigma’s sharpness really is. The fidelity of the Sigma 70-200mm lens means you can scale your photos a bit beyond 100% and still retain respectable sharpness. In practical terms, this means higher quality prints at larger sizes, and the ability to really dig into your photos to create a better composition in post.

One last thought on image quality concerns color fringing. I’ve read elsewhere that Canon lenses tend to fringe with a magenta tint, and Sigmas tend to fringe with a greenish tint. That green fringe is evident here. I can also say through experience that the amount of color fringing on the Sigma is less than it is on my Canon lenses. This only applies to the Canon lenses I own, and the amount of difference in fringing varies from lens to lens.

So, here’s where I, the reviewer, try to summarize my thoughts on the subject. Before I do that, however, let me just address one argument that many photographers have made since the beginning of time. That is, simply, that you should never waste money on a non-brand lens.

When I first used this lens 2 weeks ago, it only took a few hours before someone said, “That’s not a Canon lens, but hey, it’s cheaper, right?”

“Cheaper, and perhaps better.”, I replied. The guy who made the comment looked shocked. I’m sure he either felt I was a first year newb photographer, or that I was just crazy. But, when I turned the camera around and showed him some of the photos I was taking he simply nodded, shut his mouth and sat down in his chair. Why? Because the proof is in the pudding; you can’t dispute results.

I’ve owned a 70-200 Canon lens for over 6 years and I’ve loved it every time I’ve used it. The cold, hard truth however, is that this Sigma is better. Oh yea, it’s cheaper too.

My Favorite Light Modifier – the Westcott 7′ Umbrella

 

In my search for great, cheap gear, this is one is a must-have

Modifiers let photographers take their light and mess around, get creative. Small modifiers can give you a sharp, zappy light with strong contrast. Large modifiers can even out shadows, spilling light across a surface. Huge modifiers do the same, only they take that principle to the extreme! At 7 feet, this Westcott umbrella is about as big as you can get while still being manageable in the field.

Because it’s an umbrella, albeit a very large one, it folds up quickly and easily into a relatively small volume. That means you can throw it into the back of your small car, or take it with you into the field without having to deal with something more cumbersome like a metal framed light panel. Like most studio umbrellas, nearly all studio light or speedlite brackets will accommodate it nicely.

One thing that really surprised me with the Westcott is how well it works with a single speedlite. You’d expect something 7 feet across to eat up the light from a tiny flash unit, but that’s not the case. A single 430ex II speedlite is more than capable of working with this gigantic modifier with great results. I’d suggest using at least two speedlites to help preserve battery life, but in a pinch 1 speedlite will work flawlessly.

I used this light this past weekend while photographing my step-daughter’s wedding. I only had 5 minutes to get the shot and that included light step up, composition, and posing. Because I only had one light I used a technique where you take several photos of the scene, moving the light around between each shutter release. Once you’re done you stitch the photos together, creating a photo that looks as though it was light with 4 or more giant modifiers.

Below is the final photo, beautifully lit thanks to the Westcott 7′ White Umbrella

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Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG APO OS HSM Image Samples, Quick review

 

the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 from lensrentals has arrived. Here are some sample images

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8

I was very excited to have this lens arrive. I am renting it specifically for a job I have coming up over the next week that requires a lot of hand-held photography and the Optical Stabilization offered by the Sigma is the chief reason why I choose to rent this particular lens.

Image Quality was also important and all of the reviews I read online indicated that this lens would be a great choice. Below are a few sample images I took with the Sigma while walking through the yard. All photos were taken with the aperture wide open at f/2.8.


 

Benjamin Lehman is a commercial portrait and advertising photographer in the Canton, Northeast Ohio area

Polar Bear Jump in Akron, Ohio. Photography in a Blizzard.

The weather forecast was calling for 3-6 inches of snow, the temp hovering around 33 degrees. If you’ve ever lived on the east coast, then you know it can snow even when the temp is above freezing and this can cause you a few problems.

How to Survive Bad Weather as a Photographer

Whether it’s 36 degrees Fahrenheit , or -10 below, the problems dealing with the cold are pretty much the same; staying warm is your first-most priority. The second priority is staying dry if possible. Anything below 20 degrees and this is relatively easy. The colder the air temperature, the less likelihood the snow will melt upon landing on you and your equipment.

But when temperatures get above 20, especially above 32 degrees, snow can melt on contact and ultimately effect your clothes and equipment in the same way as if you were standing in a rain storm. For the event, we would be standing on the ice, over a frozen lake, right in the middle of the action and subsequently, the weather. I took this into account and set up several shoot-through umbrellas attached to light stands to act as actual umbrellas, keeping the snow off of my speedlites and giving me a dry place to stand. When I had to change location to get a better vantage point for a photo, I would take my photo and then retreat under the umbrella and dab-dry my camera with a soft towel. This meant my camera gear was never in any real danger from water damage.

Another issue with shooting in a blizzard is visibility. I had brought my speedlites so I could stop the action in midair, just as these poor folks were about to take the plunge, as well as to help equalize the exposure between the subject and the near-pure white background. Problem is, when the snow is coming down heavily and you shoot with a flash, all you’ll see is the reflected light bouncing off the snow in the air, ultimately overexposing your photo. Because of this I had to work in two modes. One mode was in shutter priority with no flash. I never use shutter priority, like never ever. But here, where I need around 1/600 of a second to get a crisp action shot, using Shutter Priority was the best bet. For this scenario I also had my ISO bumped up to 800 and my aperture around f/11 (+/- a few stops depending on the changing light).

When the snow would let up a little, I would turn back to using my speedlites. I was using multiple speedlites to help spread the load so as not to overtax the batteries.  The lights were TTL, unmodified, zoomed out to their max. When using the lights my camera was set at 1/200 of a second, around f/8 and an ISO of 100. 1/200 of a second works here because the flash is stopping the action, rather than raw shutter speed. You could also have used Highspeed Sync in this case, but the burden on your flashes would mean long recycle times and possible missed photo opportunities due to that recycle time.

The was coming down so thick at times it was hard to even stop and look at my LCD screen to see how we were doing with the photos. The snow and water made everything on the back of the LCD blurry and I just had to trust in my own knowledge and the TTL system.

I was very happy to see that the 5D Mark III’s auto focus system handled the heavy snow amazingly well. There were a few hiccups where it would focus on  an area of falling snow, rather than the intended subject, but for the most part it cut through the white stuff and found the target nearly all of the time.

We spent 4 hours on the ice, in the driving snow, in the freezing cold and, to be honest, I started to envy the jumpers who only had to spend 10 seconds in the 33 degree water before being whisked off to a heated tent. But the experience was fantastic. I actually like being in the snow, and there, in the middle of this expansive frozen lake, I found the setting very beautiful.

It should be mentioned that it was because of my great friends at the Akron-Canton Regional Food Bank that I got the opportunity to come and take photos of this thrilling (chilling?) event. I strongly ask you to support ACRBD and other Food Banks by donating food, time, and money. It’s a great cause!

Benjamin Lehman is a Commercial Advertising, Portrait, Event and Wedding Photographer in the Canton, Northeast Ohio area.

Weather or Not

Sometimes you just hope the stars align. It can be the talent; are they willing to go along with this crazy idea of mine? Sometimes it’s making the client understand the intricacies of the shot. Sometimes it’s something that’s completely out of your control like the weather.

Dealing with, and planning for weather as a photographer

Weather is the bane of all photographers. At best you can rely on the weather channel to give you the conditions that may exist in, oh, say 2 hours from now. For fairly small time frames, weather predictions are usually in the ball-park of what the reality will be. But, say the shoot is 5 days away, a week, 10 days or more! Well, then you’re stepping into some really iffy territory. Sure, you can probably be guaranteed that it’s not going to snow in the middle of July, but trying to predict puffy clouds against a clear sky at sunset a week from today? Yeah, not gonna happen – most likely.  If you’re lucky everything will work out, and if you’re not, you are in for total re-think of how you have to approach your photo.

I’m not trying to get a pretty good photo, I am trying to get THE photo, the one that is in my head. During rainy seasons we’ll often set a primary day and then a back up day just in case the weather is not cooperating at all. This is sort of ‘best-case’ planning for avoiding ‘worst-case’ scenarios. Even then, if your back-up date approaches and the weather still isn’t in your corner, you have to be ready to prepared to make the best of what you’ve been given. Thankfully, bad weather doesn’t mean bad photos. As Moose Peterson says, some of the best photos are made in the worst weather. Even then, however, it’s not a good idea to drag your model into a tornado and just hope she keeps her face to the light as she’s being lifted into the air, on her way to meet the Great and Powerful Oz.

There are also times when a certain type of weather is a necessity in your photo. Your rain jacket product shoot might require a backdrop of storm clouds, or that magazine shoot you’re on depends on a sunny beach while you’re taking photos of surfers. In these cases you have 3 options.

  • Take your photo in whatever weather you’re given and then make any needed changes in post.
  • Head into the studio and just make the weather you need
  • Pay a shaman to keep the bad-weather demons at bay

You wouldn’t be the first photographer who’s had to resort to any of the above options. Personally, in a pinch, I would opt for the studio option if all else fails. But, in my opinion, there’s no substitute for the real thing.

All of this came into play recently when I had a shoot scheduled, several weeks in advance, that called for snow. I wanted the whole sha-bang. Snow on the ground and snow falling from the sky. Why was falling snow important? Well, it would be nice to capture snow falling throughout the image, but more important, nothing beats the look of freshly fallen snow on the ground. So, with my desire for fresh snow firmly in place, so began the anxiety laced waiting game. You know the game, the one where you’re checking weather.com 5 times a day to see if your dreams will come true?

Luck was on my side. As the day approached the likely hood of snow kept increasing. On the day of the shoot snow was forecast to start falling at 4pm, exactly 1 hour before the scheduled shoot – Perfect! We packed up the gear and headed out. Our location was an area next to the Cuyahoga river, deep inside of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Less than 15 minutes from our arrival the snow began to fall, heavily. So heavily in fact we lost control of our car for a moment as it struggled to deal with the inch of fresh snow covering the small, windy road. We made it off of the road and into the parking lot without further issues.

There was a new problem however. Remember all that snow I wished for? Well, there was so much snow falling that it caused a white out. Visibility was no more than just 20 feet or so – not so good for a photo that required a river-scape in the background. Hedging our bets we walked down the trails to our final location and began to set up our gear.

In any situation where you’re dealing with wet conditions (snow is, after all, just water) it’s important to take the safety of your gear into consideration. We took extra shoot-through umbrellas and used them as, well, umbrellas, shielding our flashes from the heavy snow. My cameras, a 5d mark II and mark III, are both weather proofed so as long as I took some simple precautions to keep them from being heavily soaked they would be fine.

By the time we finished our set up, the falling snow had slowed down to a workable level. We got the talent in place and started to snap away. Right away, we knew everything was working beautifully. The snow, the light, the location, the river – all of it was playing together just as I had seen it in my head for all of these weeks. It felt so great to have everything come together at the last moment and, pun alert, just click.

Not all shoots will work out this well. The weather is something you can’t predict with any degree of certainty, at  least not 100%, so you have to plan ahead  – sometimes weeks ahead. Be prepared to be flexible, and make sure  your client understands they may need to be flexible too.  If it’s a large budget shoot with a lot riding on the final frame, it’s worth taking the time to get it done right in the right conditions.

The scene at the Cuyahoga River on a snowy day. Because of the low light conditions, the entire scene took on a blue hue - meaning we wouldn't have to mess with color balance to give the final image an over all cool feeling.

The scene at the Cuyahoga River on a snowy day. Because of the low light conditions, the entire scene took on a blue hue – meaning we wouldn’t have to mess with color balance to give the final image an over all cool feeling.

My wife and assistant, steps in front of the camera as we set up the flashes so we can test the quality of light. Notice how the bluish hue of the background helps her 'pop' out of the background. Cool background colors vibrate well with warm skin tones.

My wife and assistant, steps in front of the camera as we set up the flashes so we can test the quality of light. Notice how the bluish hue of the background helps her ‘pop’ out of the background. Cool background colors vibrate well with warm skin tones.

Benjamin Lehman is a Commercial Advertising, Portrait and Wedding Photographer in the Canton, Northeast Ohio area.

 

Near the End of Winter

Winter is coming to a close – cold mornings bring snow, all to be washed away by after noon rain, and then draped in snow once again as the sun sets. This transition from winter to spring is often marked by potholed streets edged with slopes of dirty snow, but you can still find some winter-chilled character in landscapes and the people who are interacting with it.

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