Exposure Triangle

While recently hosting a new online photography art therapy class (which you can watch at twitch.tv/warriorbeatorg!) we ran across this amazing Exposure Value Simulator via dima.fi.

It really helps explains the relation between shutter speed, aperture and ISO. I suggest you give it a try!

Stacked and Layered Photos – How to Composite Multiple Photos Together To Make One Image

Stacked and Layered Photos - How to Composite Multiple Photos Together To Make One Image

I’ve wanted to write this post for some time now. This is a very straight forward technique that only requires a little thought and pre-planning to pull off, but the results could save you a lot of time on location as well as money that would otherwise be spent on gear.

A composite is a picture that is crafted from elements from multiple sources, usually other photographs. The pros of compositing is that you can use small amount of gear to achieve a final product that looks like it involved a much larger production. For instance, you can take one light and position it in 5 different locations, taking a photograph each time you move the light and then use tricky compositing techniques to craft a final image that appears to have 5 separate lights in it. Make sense?

Let’s use some examples from a recent job I did for B-Tek – a high impact, heavy load scale manufacturer. They had a massive scale that weighed several thousand pounds at least that they needed photos for. After doing a quick location scout I realized their warehouse would make a great backdrop for our photo. The trick was how to make the product stand out from the busy warehouse, but also craft the background into something that was pleasing and helped tell the industrial-strength nature of their product. It would take 20 lights, at least, to pull this off. That investment in lights would be many thousands of dollars and is just not feasible for me. So, instead of relying on 20 different lights we just take 20 different pictures, moving the light between each picture,  and edit them together in a manner that recreates the use of multiple light sources. 

The photos below illustrate a few examples of how I move the light between each take. 

The process here is pretty straight forward – Light the subject and location as you would if you had 20 or so lights, only do it one photo at a time. Take care to note what you’re lighting and make sure you’ve got everything covered by the time you’re done. In some cases you can fake it back in Photoshop if you missed one light position, but it’s better to get right during the shoot rather than try to recreate something you’ve missed.

The next step is to open all of your images as a stack in Photoshop. “Stack”, is a term used by Photoshop in its File menu, but what you are actually doing here is opening all of these images and putting them on separate layers inside of one document. The next part of this technique is to use the mask tool on the various layers so you are only keeping the parts you want visible. The idea is to keep all of the good parts and, as a whole, create a single, coherent photo. This step can be hard to pull off on the first try and we’re not going to get into the nuts-n-bolts of Photoshop masks since there are great tutorials out there (like this one from Phlearn) but the concept is to only keep the parts of each layer that you’ve purposely lit with your flash and discard the rest. Here is a very simplified animation I created to show you the key process of stacking. 

Yes, this animation glosses over all of the masking needed to pull off the final image, but I think it’s important to see the idea of multiple layers in action since it will be those individual layers that will allow you to make your final composite. Once you’ve finished masking you’re almost all set. What’s left are the final tweaks, such as color correction, spot removal, product beautifying, and over all clean-up.  In our case, here’s the final image we created.

In the end, this technique worked great for the shoot and the client was thrilled – and that is always the best part!

 

Benjamin Lehman is a commercial photographer in the Cleveland, Akron, Canton and North East Ohio area. 

You Choose – A Video by Benjamin Lehman Photography

Benjamin Lehman Films Local Commercial for Young Entrepreneurs, You Choose

I was approached by STOMP cast member, Elec Simon, (who – full disclosure – also happens to be one of my best friends), about creating a video for a group of young entrepreneurs he had recently met. These high-schoolers created a company called You Choose and created a line of tumbler’s with inspiring messages laser etched on them. These Tumblers are crafted to serve as reminders to make positive decisions. 

We filmed this in down town Canton, Ohio at various locations, including the wonderful coffee house, Muggswigz. In addition to the filming, I also had a chance to bring 4 of the tumblers back to the studio and do some proper product shots in support of the video.

Visit You Choose at http://www.youchooseja.com and support this amazing small business!

Mike’s Hot Honey – Lighting Tutorial

Product Lighting How-To Made Easy!

I usually try to make these behind-the-scenes/tutorial posts as short and to the point as possible. The hope is you are able to get all of the information you might be looking for without all the fluff. So, let’s give it a go!

I was recently introduced to Mike’s Hot Honey and instantly fell in love with it. If you like spicy things then I strongly recommend this product for pretty much anything you could put honey on, and maybe even a few things you normally wouldn’t. 

In order to show my appreciation for their honey, which helped me through a rough cold season (hot honey and tea, yum!), I decided to give thanks by taking a fiery product photo!

Step 1 – Styling

I used some old crates as the backdrop. I also had some old glass doors I previously aged and distressed to use in the background. For the table top, I used some old palette wood that I then burned with a blow torch to give the visual suggestion that the honey was so hot that it was burning the table top. 

Step 2 – Staging

Get the products in place – There are tons of great tutorials out there that show how to become a successful food photographer – this will not be one of those. All we did was place the hero product front-and-center and then offset a plate with some toast, butter, and drizzled honey to the side of it. I “toasted” the bread using the earlier mentioned blow torch and then used a metal rod, also heated with the blow torch, to burn some lines in the bread, mimicking that old school toaster look.

Step 3 – Lighting

This is the part I love the most. We used 4 separate lights for this image. One Paul C. Buff Einstein, two Alienbees, and one old school Vivitar 285. Yes, an actual 285! We ended up using this old flash because it’s easy to hand hold and it has a very reliable optical slave attachment that makes it so I don’t have to deal with an additional radio remote. For the other three lights we are using Paul C. Buff’s flash commander system.

The lights were set up as follows:

  • Strip box to camera right, gelled orange – this is our main light as it contributes most of the light to the scene
  • Strip box to camera left, un-gelled and acting as kicker light to give the honey bottle some separation from the background. 
  • Octobox on an C-Stand, hanging above the table, pointing straight down. This is our fill light as it just helps even out some shadows
  • Hand-held Vivitar 285 speed light used for highlighting small details. 

Here is a diagram for those of us who are visual oriented learners.

Step 4

Start taking pictures! This is the stage where you are adjusting your lights so they work in concert with each other. For our picture the ratio of power from Main Light, to Kicker to Fill was something like 1 : 0.5 : 0.25

Basically that means from most power to the least, each light was about half the power of the last. Your ratio will be different! Experiment! But this is a good starting point if you are trying to recreate a similar look. Also worth remembering; the distance of your light source to the subject also determines the apparent power of the light, so be sure to play with power levels and distance!

Step 5

Keep taking pictures! This is a composite job, folks. Our final image is actually something like 18 separate images stacked on top of each other. Remember that hand held Vivitar flash I mentioned? Well, I would move it from one picture to the next, trying to find small details to highlight. When you are working in a studio environment and have a limited amount of flashes to use then this method is a life saver. By taking multiple photos you can create the look of a massive studio with 10s of flashes. You can do this whole product shoot with just one light if you wanted to!

Step 6

Bring the files into Photoshop and start compositing! The gist here is to stack all of your exposures as layers in a single file and then use masks to save the best parts of each photo. Then go in and add the small details, like fire and embers, that really bring something like this to life. Here is the final composite!

Benjamin Lehman is a commercial product, portrait, and fine art photographer in the Cleveland, Akron, Canton, and Northeast Ohio area. 

Shades of Difference and Direction « Joe McNally’s Blog

 

Source: Shades of Difference and Direction « Joe McNally’s Blog

Hard sun, big silk, beautiful light. Pretty simple. Take a nuclear blast of sunlight and tame it by interfering with its blazing, destructive path with a simple swatch of white material, and it arrives at your subject’s doorstep (face) as cuddly and friendly as a golden retriever puppy. Get fancy and add a simple white fill card to bounce a small amount back and up into the face and you got dead bang gorgeous, wraparound light. Friendly and glow-y. Below, shot at 1/3200 @ f/1.4, Nikon Z7105mm lens.

Now, I dealt myself a pretty easy hand of cards, here, having Rae Stoetzel in front of my lens. Easy-going guy, great face, fun to work with, patient beyond. (Just like all of our photo subjects, right?) But easy-going was the watchword of our workshop up on Prince Edward Island, at Dave Brosha’s beautiful, patina laden barn. Pictures everywhere up there. So thankful for the invite to come and teach. Would do it again in a heartbeat.

This is a Lastolite 6×6 Skylite panel on two c-stands overhead of him, interrupting the flow of hard sunlight, baffling it, and smoothing it out. The silk, mind you, is hovering just out of camera frame, very close to him. That’s the key. Get it as close as you can. There’s a fill board under him, kicking up some fill, and I’m shooting at 1.4 with that great looking barn for a backdrop. Boom, we’re done. Shoot like this all day, except for the fact of the sun moving, making it necessary for you to move the silk. Which I have done on jobs. Literally, all day. Move the silk. Luckily, that is usually a 12×12 silk, on a frame, supported by high rollers, which have wheels.

Okay, great light, easy-peasy, as has been said. But, shooting all day like this would have a sense of sameness to it. How do you take this gentle, overlarge swatch of light and shift it, play with it, directional-ize it?

Enter the Profoto B1-X, fitted with a 4′ RFI Octa softbox. First, the B1-X remains, for me, the quintessential big flash for location work. Yes, you can go bigger, and sometimes you need to, but the B1-X, at 500 watt seconds, pretty much covers the waterfront and then some on maybe, like, 90% of potential jobs? Easy to use, versatile as hell, and a dead bang dependable wireless transmission system makes this light indispensable.

And then, put the 4′ Octa on there and it’s magic. The 4′ size makes it big enough to be big, and small enough to maneuver, for instance, under a low slung silk. Hand held! All BTS pix shot by Annie Cahill.

The result is you have more exposure leverage over your background, and you can punch and swing the the direction of the light just about any which way, without robbing the essential soft quality of light the silk presents. The Octa fits right into the light pattern. Big and soft, but with a bit of punch.  Below shot at 1/2000 @ f/2.8 with the Nikon Z7 and 105mm lens.

Simple, subtle, effective.