Photoshoot: Robert

Senior Portraits Photoshoot with Robert at Tam O' Shanter Golf Course and Park in Canton, Ohio.

How To: Christmas Pet Portrait Recipe

Christmas Pet (And People) Portrait Recipe

As with our Halloween Portrait How-To, we’ve constructed an easy to follow recipe for some awesome Christmas Pet Portraits that will sleigh the competition. 

Here’s what you need:

  • A Pet (dog, cat, fish, or whatever else you can bribe with food to sit still)
  • 3 Light Sources- We’re using studio strobes, but continuous lights or Speedlites will work too
  • Light Stands
  • Solid Color Backdrop or Wall
  • Something festive
  • Colored Gel or Light
  • Camera

The trickiest part of this concoction is the 3 light set up. Here is a BTS photo:

 

Quite simply, what’s happening here is that we have one light with a gridded soft-box and red gel pointing at our background. Even though the backdrop is gray, the fact that we are using a red gel on the light means it will be appear to be red when we take our photo.

The second light to the back-right is another gridded soft-box, in this case a strip-box, pointed at the back edge of our subject. This is used to help separate your subject from the background and to supply a little extra contrast. 

Our main light, the big one in upper left hand corner, is an octobox that is placed above our subject, looking down at roughly a 45 degree angle. 

There is one other thing in play here that may not be obvious right off the bat, but do you see that white fluffy material I am using as snow on the table there? It sort of acts like a reflector and bounces a lot of the light from our main light back up into our subject – that means we don’t have to use a fill board, or a forth light, to fill in shadows. If you’re not using a light colored material for your subject to sit on like we are you may have to use a bounce card or reflector to achieve the same results.

Let’s get our model, Sophia, in here and take a picture!

Wow, that was easy! Now, obviously we glossed over some things like lighting power and ratios, but the truth is it all depends on your set up. For example, with our medium gray backdrop and deep red gelled light, we had to turn our background light up to full power! However, if we were going with a lighter pink gel, or even a background that was already the right color, the power settings would have been much less.

Same goes for our model. Sophia here has black fur, so again we have to pump a little extra light to draw out details, but a lighter shade of fur would take less oomph to illuminate.

If you’re looking for a baking metaphor here it is, the basic ingredients are the same, but the baking time and temperatures may vary (it’s the best metaphor I could come up with, sorry!)

Benjamin Lehman is a commercial photographer in the Cleveland, Akron, Canton and North East Area of Ohio.

Band Portraits in the Black Key’s Rehearsal Space

How to Take Portraits in a new, untested environment.

I had a really amazing opportunity to take some band photos in a space that, surpise, turned out to be the Black Keys’ rehearsal space! How cool!

I wanted to quickly run down how this photo is taken since it’s really illustrates a few basic, but important aspects of location scouting a planning.

Scouting

When you’re in a new location, you’ve got to make time to just look around. This being the Black Keys’ space, you know it’s going to be filled with character, but you still have to find the spot that’s going to work with your needs. Our needs were we needed a location that would work for both group and individual photos. We were moving fast since some of the band members had limited time — a specific factor like that is going to influence your choice heavily, so be ready!

Lighting

Once I settled on a location (a cool hallway filled with touring gear) I send the band off to their rehearsal and started to set up my lights. I knew I was going to to use 3 lights and my plan was to gel two of those lights with complimentary colors. 

Main Light

The mainlight was a 51 inch reverse-bounce umbrella known as a soft-lighter. I set that up at the beginning of the hallway, facing down towards the band. I am using this light to both fill in shadows (so it’s acting as a fill, to some degree) but also make sure the main features of our subjects aren’t overly washed with color from our other two lights.

Fill Light

Our fill light is an orange gelled Alinebees 800 with a reflector dish pointed at the wall. I am using the wall as a bounce so I can effectively turn it into a massive softbox. The light is just about 1 full stop of power less than our main light. 

Ambient Light

There’s a technique I don’t see used EVER in photography, or at least it’s never mentioned, and that is the use of a strobe as an ambient light source. Just to define what I mean by Ambient — it is a source of light that lives everywhere through the photo. That may not initially make much sense, but in a practical sense your ambient light is the light that you control using your shutter speed. We all know that even when you’re using a lot of strobes to light your photo, you can turn your shutter speed down far enough so that more light bleeds in from the environment – that light is the ambient light. 

The cool thing is, you can actually use strobes to control that as well. The only two rules to creating ambient light is:

  1. That your ambient light strobe washes evenly throughout the photo
  2. That your ambient light strobe’s power is higher than the natural light but weaker than your main flashes.

To tackle rule #1, making sure the light reaches everywhere, I had the flash pointed at the ceiling. This meant the light bounced up and then cascaded down throughout the photo evenly. 

Rule #2 is easy, you just dial it up or down until you only see it’s influence in the shadows of your subjects. In our photo you can see the ambient light (gelled as a deep teal) on the walls and on the shadow side of our subject — Perfect!

Taking Photos

The next step is the easy part! And working with a group a guys like the Yankee Bravo crew just makes the process of taking photos easy and fun! Over the course of about 30 minutes we worked through several different set ups and then we were outta there! I’ve attached the lighting diagram so you can get a rough idea of where I had everything placed and the final photos are here to show you what we were able to create!

It was an amazing experience, and the band (Yankee Bravo – go check em out!) were just the best group of guys you could ask to work with. The space was amazing to work with as well. Just everything about this shoot was so amazing!

Benjamin Lehman is a Commercial, Advertising and Portrait Photographer in the Cleveland, Akron, and North East Area of Ohio. 

Behind the Scenes: Three Light Portrait at the Massillon Woman’s Club

Three Flash Portrait Lighting at the Massillon Woman's Club

I am a huge fan of single light portraits, and I don’t always think, “more is better.” Sometimes, however, you can help craft a particular mood by adding a few extra lights into your scene to help convey story and emotion. In this simple behind the scenes look, I am going to share with you a diagram and final photo. 

The idea comes first, of course, and in this case we wanted to capture a grand mood set by some reference materials the subject and I had agreed upon. After that we had to scout for a location, and after nearly a month of looking around we stumbled into an amazing mansion that was practically in our own back yard! This place, known as the Massillon Woman’s Club, located in Massillon, Ohio, turned out to be an amazing backdrop and the perfect setting for our portraits. 

The 3 point lighting set-up I used for this photo is something I devised in my head while scouting the location a few days prior to shooting. I wanted a dramatic balance between detail and shadows, keeping much of the area around the subject subdued so she would pop out of the darker areas. To do this I used one main light (Paul C. Buff Einstein) outfitted with a grided softbox, a second, fill light (Paul C. Buff Alienbees) with a blue gelled reflector, and a background light (another Paul C. Buff Alienbees) fitted with a reflector and orange gel. 

The main light is pointed at our subject, from camera-left, at a fairly standard 45/45 degree position (45 degrees pointed down, and 45 degrees to the side of the subject). The fill is pointed at our subject from camera-right at a nearly 90 degree angle, at head height. Lastly, the background light is camera-right, pointed towards the background structure of the room. Once everything is set up, all we need to do is press that shutter button and viola!

Our final image is one that is filled with mood, evocative, and highlights our beautiful subject.

 

Benjamin Lehman is a Commercial, Portrait, Advertising and Wedding Photographer in the Canton, Akron, Cleveland, and North East Ohio Areas. 

Learn Flash Photography In Under One Minute!

Intimidated by flash photography? You won't be after this quick video!

In this new video, Ben is going to teach you how to use Flash in your photography in under one minute! It’s really that easy!